PERIPHERIES 2018

[Kindly supported by ARTS OFFICE Wexford County Council & Gorey Municipal Council.]

DESTROY ALL HEROES

Gorey School of Art | 27 JULY — 4 AUGUST 2018

LAURA FITZGERALD — DAVID GODBOLD — WILLIAM MURRAY — JOY GERRARD — RAYMOND PETTIBON

 JOY GERRARD,  Protest Crowd ( Women's March, Montpellier 2017) . 2018, Print on paper (120gsm) 10 x panels. Dimensions. 420cm x 220cm. Courtesy the artist.  

JOY GERRARD, Protest Crowd ( Women's March, Montpellier 2017). 2018, Print on paper (120gsm) 10 x panels. Dimensions. 420cm x 220cm. Courtesy the artist.
 

PRESS RELEASE

GOREY SCHOOL OF ART’S 8TH PERIPHERIES EXHIBITION WILL BE THE HIGHLIGHT OUR ANNUAL EXHIBITION PROGRAMME AT PERIPHERY SPACE AND IS CO-DEVELOPED BY JAMES MERRIGAN AND EMMA ROCHE


DESTROY ALL HEROES is a group exhibition presenting artworks that explore the grey matter of thinking and feeling through the medium of drawing and text. Presenting four artists – Laura Fitzgerald, Joy Gerrard, David Godbold and William Murray – the exhibition begins where most superheroes begin, with the ZINE, defined as a cheaply-made, cheaply-priced publication, often in black and white, but brimming with the personalities and passions of its creators. 

The series of zines DESTROY ALL MONSTERS (1976-1979) by American “part-time punk band, part-time art collective” (Cary Loren, Mike Kelley, Niagara and Jim Shaw) is an influence that runs throughout the exhibition and its component parts, even in name. But as a mark of respect for subcultural tenets we have inverted Mike Kelley et al’s influence to put the head of the HERO on the chopping block in place of the MONSTER. 

From the outset the production of a ZINE made of Real white paper and Real black ink has been a Real desire, especially with Laura, Joy, David, and William in mind. We felt the DIY ZINE represented a kind of internalised and intimate propaganda for those caught on the edges of the socio-political-economic-cultural swell. We asked the question: Does the internalisation of something like propaganda, something that is meant for the poster/pulpit/throne for politician/priest/king have a different nature, a different purpose in the hands of the artist? 

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Presentation of original Raymond Pettibon zine collection from the 1980s—courtesy of exhibiting artist David Godbold. 

“A significant figure of the Southern Californian punk scene in the late 70s and 80s, Raymond Pettibon started his artistic career making scrappy zines, handbills and flyers for his band Black Flag and his brother’s record label, SST Pubs. These early zines feature comic-like illustrations paired with bizarre, ironic, and often seemingly disjointed text. Particularly focusing on the dissemination of post-war American culture, Pettibon works with recurring themes of sexuality, violence, youth-culture, religion and idols.” (Printed Matter, New York)

 DESTROY ALL HEROES ZINE | 40 copies | €5

DESTROY ALL HEROES ZINE | 40 copies | €5

ARTIST TALK (LAURA FITZGERALD)

At face value the definitions of “one-liner” do not hold much water for the contemporary artist: a short joke, witty remark, humorous anecdote, gag, jape, jest, laugh. One-liners come with an apology. For some the one-liner is the difference between advertising and art, wit and width. As Dorothy Parker quipped on her own talent for one-liners: “Brevity is the soul of lingerie.” But ironically, like Parker's witticism, the one-liner can spur the imagination; and in rare instances sum up the depths of Being and Time in a few well placed words.

Laura Fitzgerald’s captioned drawings currently displayed in Gorey School of Art’s Periphery Space are distilled from a family album of life, work and art experiences that have been orphaned on paper for us to adopt and make our own. Sometimes gestural, other times surgical, the lines of Laura’s drawings are made flesh and blood by the self-effacing captions that unearth the artist’s fractured humour.

In Laura’s world rocks (of all things) are human too; so human they sometimes need therapy. Borne of a self-reflexive personality and temperament acutely aware and open to the social and political world around her, Laura’s current protagonist, Brian, is made of the most bloodless and unwieldy of substances: rock.

On the final day (August 4th at 12pm) of the group exhibition DESTROY ALL HEROES (with David Godbold, William Murray, Joy Gerrard, Raymond Pettibon) exhibiting artist Laura Fitzgerald will discuss her work in the flesh with Emma Roche and James Merrigan in the gallery, exploring a scrapbook of subjects, from joy and nihilism to therapy and rocks. 

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